Hybrid Athlete Food Blog

Blackberry Square

Posted by Lacey Byrd on

Blackberry Square

Ready in 20 minutes

Serves 6 people

Per Serving: 

Calories: 173

Protein: 4

Carbohydrates: 18

Fat: 9

Ingredients

  • 65 g almond flour
  • 80 g oat flour
  • 20 g medjoul dates
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 20 ml coconut oil
  • 15 ml coconut milk
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 70 g frozen blackberries
  • 65 g ripe banana
  • 20 g honey

Preparation

  1. Put the flour, Medjool dates, coconut oil, vanilla, and coconut milk in the food processor and make a dough.
  2. Then spread half of the dough in the form of crumbs on the bottom of the tray.
  3. Put the remaining ingredients in the food processor, turn it into a sauce.
  4. Spread the sauce on the dough.
  5. Spread the remaining dough in the form of crumbs and bake in the preheated oven at 170°C for 30 minutes.
  6. Slice into squares after cooled.

Tips

Serve with Halo Top ice cream or dairy free whipped cream

Read more

Blackberry Square

Posted by Lacey Byrd on

Blackberry Square

Ready in 20 minutes

Serves 6 people

Per Serving: 

Calories: 173

Protein: 4

Carbohydrates: 18

Fat: 9

Ingredients

  • 65 g almond flour
  • 80 g oat flour
  • 20 g medjoul dates
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 20 ml coconut oil
  • 15 ml coconut milk
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 70 g frozen blackberries
  • 65 g ripe banana
  • 20 g honey

Preparation

  1. Put the flour, Medjool dates, coconut oil, vanilla, and coconut milk in the food processor and make a dough.
  2. Then spread half of the dough in the form of crumbs on the bottom of the tray.
  3. Put the remaining ingredients in the food processor, turn it into a sauce.
  4. Spread the sauce on the dough.
  5. Spread the remaining dough in the form of crumbs and bake in the preheated oven at 170°C for 30 minutes.
  6. Slice into squares after cooled.

Tips

Serve with Halo Top ice cream or dairy free whipped cream

Read more


Creamy Chicken Edamame Pasta

Posted by Lacey Byrd on

Creamy Chicken Edamame Pasta

Ready in 25 minutes

Serves 2  people

Per Serving: 

Calories: 312

Protein: 39

Carbohydrates: 30

Fat: 7

Ingredients

  • 80 g Edamame Pasta
  • 100 g Chicken Breast
  • 100 g Broccoli
  • 20 g Chopped Onion
  • 60 mL Cream
  • ½ tsp Coconut Powder
  • Salt
  • Black pepper

Preparation

    1. Cook the pasta according to packet instructions.
    2. Cook the broccoli until tender.
    3.  While pasta is boiling, heat the olive oil in a pan.. Cook onion and garlic. Then add the chicken to the pan and Season the chicken with salt and pepper.
    4. Stir until chicken is lightly golden browned. Add the boiled and drained broccoli into the pan then saute.
    5. Add the cream and coconut powder to the pan and stir gently until the sauce thickens
    6. Combine the drained pasta and sauce in the pan and cook.

Read more

Creamy Chicken Edamame Pasta

Posted by Lacey Byrd on

Creamy Chicken Edamame Pasta

Ready in 25 minutes

Serves 2  people

Per Serving: 

Calories: 312

Protein: 39

Carbohydrates: 30

Fat: 7

Ingredients

  • 80 g Edamame Pasta
  • 100 g Chicken Breast
  • 100 g Broccoli
  • 20 g Chopped Onion
  • 60 mL Cream
  • ½ tsp Coconut Powder
  • Salt
  • Black pepper

Preparation

    1. Cook the pasta according to packet instructions.
    2. Cook the broccoli until tender.
    3.  While pasta is boiling, heat the olive oil in a pan.. Cook onion and garlic. Then add the chicken to the pan and Season the chicken with salt and pepper.
    4. Stir until chicken is lightly golden browned. Add the boiled and drained broccoli into the pan then saute.
    5. Add the cream and coconut powder to the pan and stir gently until the sauce thickens
    6. Combine the drained pasta and sauce in the pan and cook.

Read more


Herb Mediterranean Fish

Posted by Lacey Byrd on


Herb Mediterranean Fish

Ready in 25 minutes

Serves 4 people

Per serving: 

Calories: 214

Protein: 18g

Carbohydrates: 11g

Fat: 11g

Ingredients


  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 
  • ½ large sweet onion, sliced 
  • 3 cups sliced cremini mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 4 cups chopped kale
  • 1 medium tomato, diced 
  • 2 teaspoons Mediterranean Herb Mix
  • 2 tablespoons dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons dried rosemary
  • 2 tablespoons dried thyme
  • 1 tablespoon dried mint
  • 1 tablespoon dried sage
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice 
  • ½ teaspoon salt, divided
  • ½ teaspoon ground pepper, divided
  • 4 (4 ounce) cod, sole, or tilapia fillets
  • Chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

 

Preparation

Step 1

  1. Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion; cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent, 3 to 4 minutes. Add mushrooms and garlic; cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms release their liquid and begin to brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Add kale, tomato, and 1 tsp. herb mix. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the kale is wilted and the mushrooms are tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in lemon juice and 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper. Remove from heat, cover, and keep warm.

Step 2


Sprinkle fish with the remaining 1 tsp. herb mix and 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper. Heat the remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the fish and cook until the flesh is opaque, 2 to 4 minutes per side, depending on thickness. Transfer the fish to 4 plates or a serving platter. Top and surround the fish with the vegetables; sprinkle with parsley, if desired.

Read more

Herb Mediterranean Fish

Posted by Lacey Byrd on


Herb Mediterranean Fish

Ready in 25 minutes

Serves 4 people

Per serving: 

Calories: 214

Protein: 18g

Carbohydrates: 11g

Fat: 11g

Ingredients


  • 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 
  • ½ large sweet onion, sliced 
  • 3 cups sliced cremini mushrooms
  • 2 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 4 cups chopped kale
  • 1 medium tomato, diced 
  • 2 teaspoons Mediterranean Herb Mix
  • 2 tablespoons dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons dried rosemary
  • 2 tablespoons dried thyme
  • 1 tablespoon dried mint
  • 1 tablespoon dried sage
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice 
  • ½ teaspoon salt, divided
  • ½ teaspoon ground pepper, divided
  • 4 (4 ounce) cod, sole, or tilapia fillets
  • Chopped fresh parsley, for garnish

 

Preparation

Step 1

  1. Heat 1 Tbsp. oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion; cook, stirring occasionally, until translucent, 3 to 4 minutes. Add mushrooms and garlic; cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms release their liquid and begin to brown, 4 to 6 minutes. Add kale, tomato, and 1 tsp. herb mix. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the kale is wilted and the mushrooms are tender, 5 to 7 minutes. Stir in lemon juice and 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper. Remove from heat, cover, and keep warm.

Step 2


Sprinkle fish with the remaining 1 tsp. herb mix and 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper. Heat the remaining 2 Tbsp. oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the fish and cook until the flesh is opaque, 2 to 4 minutes per side, depending on thickness. Transfer the fish to 4 plates or a serving platter. Top and surround the fish with the vegetables; sprinkle with parsley, if desired.

Read more


How Important Are Micronutrients?

Posted by Lacey Byrd on

How Important Are Micronutrients?

 

In the modern-day world, we are constantly blasted with often contradicting information about nutrition.

 

Some people swear by the importance of protein and animal products, while others tell us it’s all about the caloric balance.

 

Now, because fat, protein and carbohydrates are taking the majority of the attention, one thing remains quite ignored…

 

That is namely, the importance of micronutrients, which is the topic of discussion for today!

 

So without further ado, let us go in depth on micronutrients and discuss what they are, what they do in the body and what the best sources are!

 

Macro VS Micro

 

So what exactly is the difference between macronutrients and micronutrients?

 

Well, as the names suggest, macronutrients are the primary nutrients our bodies need in big quantities - Protein, fats and carbohydrates.

 

These nutrients provide caloric value and are needed to sustain a healthy body weight and physiological functioning.

 

On the other hand, micronutrients do not really have a caloric value, but are just as important, due to their role in a variety of important processes all around the body.

 

Micronutrients include phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals and last but not least, antioxidants!

 

The body needs these nutrients to sustain the production of a variety of enzymes and hormones, which relate to the overall healthy functioning of the organism.

 

Micronutrient Deficiencies

Though the body needs micronutrients in small amounts, their absence quickly surfaces with a flurry of unwanted side effects.

 

For example, a magnesium deficiency can cause you to:

 

  1. Have bad sleep
  2. Crave sugar
  3. Cramp
  4. Be unable to focus on the task at hand

 

Vitamins and minerals are an important part of human nutrition, mainly because they help kids grow healthy and strong, while adults can reap the benefits of sustained health.

 

Fortunately enough, micronutrient deficiencies are generally easy to diagnose and can be seamlessly treated with various supplements and foods.

 

Common Micronutrient Deficiencies

 

With the abundance of nutrient-poor foods that many people survive on, micronutrient deficiencies are quite a common thing!

 

Here are the most common micronutrient deficiencies found in humans:

 

  1. Vitamin B12
  2. Iron deficiency
  3. Iodine
  4. Magnesium
  5. Vitamin D

 

Some of these are easy to diagnose and don’t hide much risk, but others can cause severe discomfort and if sustained in the long term, even damage.

 

For instance, B12 deficiencies which are common in vegans and vegetarians, can lead to anemia, memory issues, mood swings, irregular work of the heart and even neurological problems.

 

Micronutrient-Rich Foods


Unless you have severe deficiencies, micronutrient supplements are not really mandatory, as most deficiencies can be treated with a slight change in nutritional habits.


Let’s have a look at the most vitamin & mineral-abundant foods!

 

  1. Fatty fish - Omega-3s, vitamin D
  2. Citrus fruits - Vitamin C, Folic acid
  3. Carrots - Vitamin A
  4. Eggs- Vitamin B, Iron
  5. Avocados - Vitamins B2, B5, B6 (And tons of healthy fat!)
  6. Kiwis - Vitamin A, C, E, K, Folate & Choline

 

Including these foods in your menu regularly will keep you away from deficiencies and maintain a balanced inner chemistry.

 

Don’t like diversifying your food sources? Shoot for micronutrient supplements!

 

Take-Home Message

 

Your best nutrition plan is a good balance between macronutrients, micronutrients and calories.

 

Though micronutrients do not provide a caloric value, they play important roles in a variety of bodily functions.


Because their deficiencies will lead to worsened function, it is important to grant sufficient micronutrition through your food.

 

Last but not least, micronutrients don’t really need to be tracked as long as you consume a variety of foods in decent amounts.

Read more

How Important Are Micronutrients?

Posted by Lacey Byrd on

How Important Are Micronutrients?

 

In the modern-day world, we are constantly blasted with often contradicting information about nutrition.

 

Some people swear by the importance of protein and animal products, while others tell us it’s all about the caloric balance.

 

Now, because fat, protein and carbohydrates are taking the majority of the attention, one thing remains quite ignored…

 

That is namely, the importance of micronutrients, which is the topic of discussion for today!

 

So without further ado, let us go in depth on micronutrients and discuss what they are, what they do in the body and what the best sources are!

 

Macro VS Micro

 

So what exactly is the difference between macronutrients and micronutrients?

 

Well, as the names suggest, macronutrients are the primary nutrients our bodies need in big quantities - Protein, fats and carbohydrates.

 

These nutrients provide caloric value and are needed to sustain a healthy body weight and physiological functioning.

 

On the other hand, micronutrients do not really have a caloric value, but are just as important, due to their role in a variety of important processes all around the body.

 

Micronutrients include phytochemicals, vitamins, minerals and last but not least, antioxidants!

 

The body needs these nutrients to sustain the production of a variety of enzymes and hormones, which relate to the overall healthy functioning of the organism.

 

Micronutrient Deficiencies

Though the body needs micronutrients in small amounts, their absence quickly surfaces with a flurry of unwanted side effects.

 

For example, a magnesium deficiency can cause you to:

 

  1. Have bad sleep
  2. Crave sugar
  3. Cramp
  4. Be unable to focus on the task at hand

 

Vitamins and minerals are an important part of human nutrition, mainly because they help kids grow healthy and strong, while adults can reap the benefits of sustained health.

 

Fortunately enough, micronutrient deficiencies are generally easy to diagnose and can be seamlessly treated with various supplements and foods.

 

Common Micronutrient Deficiencies

 

With the abundance of nutrient-poor foods that many people survive on, micronutrient deficiencies are quite a common thing!

 

Here are the most common micronutrient deficiencies found in humans:

 

  1. Vitamin B12
  2. Iron deficiency
  3. Iodine
  4. Magnesium
  5. Vitamin D

 

Some of these are easy to diagnose and don’t hide much risk, but others can cause severe discomfort and if sustained in the long term, even damage.

 

For instance, B12 deficiencies which are common in vegans and vegetarians, can lead to anemia, memory issues, mood swings, irregular work of the heart and even neurological problems.

 

Micronutrient-Rich Foods


Unless you have severe deficiencies, micronutrient supplements are not really mandatory, as most deficiencies can be treated with a slight change in nutritional habits.


Let’s have a look at the most vitamin & mineral-abundant foods!

 

  1. Fatty fish - Omega-3s, vitamin D
  2. Citrus fruits - Vitamin C, Folic acid
  3. Carrots - Vitamin A
  4. Eggs- Vitamin B, Iron
  5. Avocados - Vitamins B2, B5, B6 (And tons of healthy fat!)
  6. Kiwis - Vitamin A, C, E, K, Folate & Choline

 

Including these foods in your menu regularly will keep you away from deficiencies and maintain a balanced inner chemistry.

 

Don’t like diversifying your food sources? Shoot for micronutrient supplements!

 

Take-Home Message

 

Your best nutrition plan is a good balance between macronutrients, micronutrients and calories.

 

Though micronutrients do not provide a caloric value, they play important roles in a variety of bodily functions.


Because their deficiencies will lead to worsened function, it is important to grant sufficient micronutrition through your food.

 

Last but not least, micronutrients don’t really need to be tracked as long as you consume a variety of foods in decent amounts.

Read more


Caffeine & Training Performance

Posted by Lacey Byrd on

Caffeine & Training Performance

 

In a world broadly influenced by fitness and nutrition, the search for ingredients that improve performance is something that will never stop.

 

But even though many new companies can try and sell you on new, promising products, there are a handful of substances that have been proven to work time and again.

 

When it comes to improving athletic performance, caffeine has been one of the most used ingredients.

 

But How Does Caffeine Work?

Globally, caffeine is one of the most consumed stimulants, due to its innate ability to boost mood and energy levels.

 

However, oftentimes this stimulant is used in all the wrong ways, as the modern-day way of life is unnatural and you need energy when you’re supposed to sleep.

 

There is a compound called “adenosine” that builds up throughout the day and when it binds to certain receptors, it has a unique effect - The mind & the body relax, leading to a feeling of drowsiness.

 

And well, if you want to avoid that in a situation where you need to be active and alert, coffee seems to be the answer!

 

In the brain, caffeine blocks the adenosine receptors which makes you feel more alert, making it a perfect choice.

 

Now, though the mental fog will fall off when caffeine starts peaking in your blood, this clear focus is just one aspect of training performance.

 

Additionally, caffeine ramps up your central nervous system which is perhaps why it is proven to enhance both strength & endurance performance.

 

Recommended Doses

If you’ve had a good cup of coffee followed by a workout, you know what we’re talking about when we say that caffeine really is effective at enhancing athletic performance.

 

However, due to its nature, you can easily go overboard and experience unpleasant side effects, such as:

 

  1. High blood pressure
  2. Dizziness
  3. Headache

 

For this reason, you should stay away or at least be careful with products that contain high concentrations of caffeine and always stay below the maximum recommended daily intake.

 

For most individuals, 200-350 mg of caffeine per day would be normal and would not lead to any side effects - This is the equivalent of about 3 cups of coffee, or 1 dose of a stim-based pre-workout supplement.

Which Products Contain Caffeine?

 

Though caffeine is mostly associated with coffee, it can actually be found in a variety of other natural products, such as:

 

  • Yerba mate
  • Tea leaves
  • Guarana


Nevertheless, coffee is one of the most accessible and abundant sources of caffeine, so you can primarily focus on finding quality grains!

 

If you don’t do that, well, someone else will and then you’ll see an advertisement for the newest, most effective stimulant-based supplements!

 

This is due to the fact that caffeine is put at the core of many stimulant-based fitness supplements, such as:

 

  1. Energy drinks
  2. Pre-workout products
  3. Isolated caffeine tablets

 

These are the products that can make it more likely for you to go overboard with the intake, so don’t abuse these supplements and stay safe!

Ultimately, your best bet would be to have a solid cup of coffee, at least an hour before your workout.

 

That way, blood caffeine levels will peak right in the middle of your workout, granting energy and focus for superhuman performance!

 

Check out www.hybridathletetraining.com for all of your fitness and nutrition needs. 

Read more

Caffeine & Training Performance

Posted by Lacey Byrd on

Caffeine & Training Performance

 

In a world broadly influenced by fitness and nutrition, the search for ingredients that improve performance is something that will never stop.

 

But even though many new companies can try and sell you on new, promising products, there are a handful of substances that have been proven to work time and again.

 

When it comes to improving athletic performance, caffeine has been one of the most used ingredients.

 

But How Does Caffeine Work?

Globally, caffeine is one of the most consumed stimulants, due to its innate ability to boost mood and energy levels.

 

However, oftentimes this stimulant is used in all the wrong ways, as the modern-day way of life is unnatural and you need energy when you’re supposed to sleep.

 

There is a compound called “adenosine” that builds up throughout the day and when it binds to certain receptors, it has a unique effect - The mind & the body relax, leading to a feeling of drowsiness.

 

And well, if you want to avoid that in a situation where you need to be active and alert, coffee seems to be the answer!

 

In the brain, caffeine blocks the adenosine receptors which makes you feel more alert, making it a perfect choice.

 

Now, though the mental fog will fall off when caffeine starts peaking in your blood, this clear focus is just one aspect of training performance.

 

Additionally, caffeine ramps up your central nervous system which is perhaps why it is proven to enhance both strength & endurance performance.

 

Recommended Doses

If you’ve had a good cup of coffee followed by a workout, you know what we’re talking about when we say that caffeine really is effective at enhancing athletic performance.

 

However, due to its nature, you can easily go overboard and experience unpleasant side effects, such as:

 

  1. High blood pressure
  2. Dizziness
  3. Headache

 

For this reason, you should stay away or at least be careful with products that contain high concentrations of caffeine and always stay below the maximum recommended daily intake.

 

For most individuals, 200-350 mg of caffeine per day would be normal and would not lead to any side effects - This is the equivalent of about 3 cups of coffee, or 1 dose of a stim-based pre-workout supplement.

Which Products Contain Caffeine?

 

Though caffeine is mostly associated with coffee, it can actually be found in a variety of other natural products, such as:

 

  • Yerba mate
  • Tea leaves
  • Guarana


Nevertheless, coffee is one of the most accessible and abundant sources of caffeine, so you can primarily focus on finding quality grains!

 

If you don’t do that, well, someone else will and then you’ll see an advertisement for the newest, most effective stimulant-based supplements!

 

This is due to the fact that caffeine is put at the core of many stimulant-based fitness supplements, such as:

 

  1. Energy drinks
  2. Pre-workout products
  3. Isolated caffeine tablets

 

These are the products that can make it more likely for you to go overboard with the intake, so don’t abuse these supplements and stay safe!

Ultimately, your best bet would be to have a solid cup of coffee, at least an hour before your workout.

 

That way, blood caffeine levels will peak right in the middle of your workout, granting energy and focus for superhuman performance!

 

Check out www.hybridathletetraining.com for all of your fitness and nutrition needs. 

Read more